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PLEASE NOTE: This version of the ICF rules is now obsolete. It's just here for historical reference. The current document is ICF Slalom Rules 2001.

Slalom Racing Competition Rules as adopted by the ICF Congress in Paris in 1996

The formatting on this is a bit raw; please bear with me as I clean it up and add hyperlinks, etc. ---Rsk

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION (ICF)

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION
Slalom Racing Committee

SLALOM RACING COMPETITION RULES
to take effect from January 1st 1997

SLALOM RACING COMPETITION RULES

Index

Object
International Competition
Competitors
International Competition Calendar
Minimum Participation
Categories
Boats
Paddles
Accessories
Runs
Officials
Duties of Officials
Invitations
Entries
Acceptance of Entries
The Start Order
Competitions Programme
Alternation and Withdrawal of Entries
Start Numbers
Instructions to Team Managers
Safety Measures
Course
Approval of the Course
Training
Start
Start Order
False Start
Finish
Marking of The Gates
Negotiation
Penalties
Signalling by the Gate Judges
Clearing the Course
Loss or Breakage of Paddle
Capsize
Timing
Calculation and Posting of Results
Dead Heat
Protest
Appeal to the Competition Committee
Appeal to The Board of Directors of the ICF
Disqualification and Elimination
Special Rules Relative to World Championships
Organisation
Participation
Runs
Scheduling of Competitions
Invitations
Entries
Acceptance of Entries
The Start Order
Programme
Officials
ICF
Jury
Officials
Course
Timing
Anti
Doping
Awards
Results and Reports
42. Special Rules for Olympic Games
43. Special Rules for Junior World
see Section II
44. Special Rules for World Cup Competition in Slalom
see Section III
45. Special Rules for the calculation of World Ranking
see Section IV
1. Object

1.1. The object of slalom racing competition is to negotiate a rapid river course, defined by gates, without fault, in the shortest possible time.

2. International Competitions

2.1 All competitions announced as international shall be governed by the rules of the ICF.

2.1.1. Competitions organised by a Federation or its affiliated associations are always regarded as international if foreign competitors are invited and participate.

2.2. An international competition must be supervised by least one judge who holds a valid card as an International Judge Slalom (IJSL).

2.2.1 These officials are appointed by the Chairman of the SLC from nominations submitted by the organisers.

2.2.1.1. Room and board for these officials is paid for by the organising Federation.

2.3. There are three types of international competitions:

2.3.1. The start order for the competitors of type A and C competitions are at the organiser s discretion. (see article 14).

2.4. There are three types of ICF competitions: World Championships Junior World Championships World Cup Competitions See specials rules 41, 43 II, and 44 III

3. Competitors

3.1. Only the members of associations affiliated with a Federation have the right to participate in an international competition.

3.2. competitor is always allowed to take part individually in an international competition but must in each case obtain special permission from his/her National Federation.

3.3.1. competitor may take part on behalf of the Federation in a foreign country in which he/she is domiciled, if he/she obtains the authorisation of his/her Federation of origin.

3.3.2. If he/she has lived for 2 years or more in this foreign country, the approval of his/her Federation of origin is no longer required.

3.3.3. competitor may not compete for more than one Federation in any one calendar year in the sport of canoeing. This rule does not apply in the case of competitor who leaves his/her country of origin to marry in another country. He/she can, in this case, compete for his/her new Federation without awaiting the delay of 2 years.

3.4. The first year a junior competitor can compete is the year in which his/her 15th birthday falls and the last year he/she may compete as a junior is the year in which his/her 18th birthday falls.

4. International Competition Calendar

4.1. By the 1st of August of each year, Federation must send to both the ICF H Q., and the Chairman of the Slalom Committee, the international competitions which they plan to hold in the following year.

4.1.1. Information shall include date, nation, venue and type (A,B, or C) of the competition.

4.1.2. Federations may amend such submissions up to 30th September that year. After that deadline, it will be considered as definitive, and should be sent to the secretarial office of the ICF to be published.

4.2. By the 1 st of November, the international calendar is published in the ICF Bulletin, or by special circular.

5. Minimum Participation

5.1. An individual or a team category cannot take place unless at least 3 competitors or 3 teams from 2 different Federations start in that category.

5.2. It is not necessary for the validity of the competition that all 3 competitors or all

3 teams finish.

6. Categories

6.1. Individuals Women K1 Men K1 Men C1 Men C2

6.1.1. competitor may only participate in one single individual category.

6.2. Teams Women

3 x K1 Men

3 x K1 Men

3 x C1 Men

3 x C2

6.2.1. Teams may only be comprised of competitors who are participating in individual categories.

6.2.2. competitor may only participate in a single team category.

6.2.3. competitor may participate in a team category different from his/her individual category.

6.2.4. Substitutions may be made for individual members of the team between the first and second runs when the competition has two runs.

6.2.4.1. Only one boat of a team may be substituted.

6.2.4.2. This change must be communicated to the Starter in writing.

6.2.5. In competition types A, B and C there may be, at the organisers discretion, Junior events in any or all of the above categories.

6.3. Start Order (see article l4)

6.3.1. In the team events the starting order is taken from the average results of the best three competitors of each Federation in each category. The starting order is the reverse order of these average results. In anomalous cases the team/s will start at the top of the list.

7. Boats Paddles Accessories

7.1. Boat Specifications

7.1.1. Measurements
All types of K1: Minimum length 4.00 m minimum width 0.60 m
All types of C1: Minimum length 4.00 m minimum width 0.70 m
All types of C2: Minimum length 4.58 m minimum width 0.80 m

7.1.2. Minimum Weights of Boats (The minimum weight of the boat is determined when the boat is dry.)
All types of Kl : 9 kg
All types of C1 : 10 kg
All types of C2 : 15 kg
Note: the spray deck is considered to be an accessory and not part of the boat.

7.1.3. All boats must have a minimum radius at each end of 2 cm horizontally and 1 cm vertically.

7.1.4. Rudders are prohibited on all boats

7.1.5. Boats must be designed to, and remain within, the required dimensions.

7.1.6. Kayak are decked boats which must be propelled by double bladed paddles and inside which the competitors sit. Canadian canoes are decked boats which must be propelled by single bladed paddles and inside which the competitors kneel.

7.2. Trademarks and Emblems

7.2.1. Boats, accessories and clothing may carry trademarks, advertising symbols (with the exception of tobacco products), emblems and words.

8. Runs

8.1. International slalom competition consists of 2 runs. For the score the results of both runs are to be added. The organiser may hold heats and finals as in ICF competitions. The start of final second run will be the reverse order of the final first run results. The final course must have no more than 6 gate changes from the original course. In team races the competition may be reduced to a single run.

9. Officials Depending on its nature and importance, an international Slalom Competition is managed by the following officials.

9.1. Competition Committee

9.1.1. Every international slalom competition must have a Competition Committee consisting of 3 or 5 members. Members of the Competition Committee must be IJSL. The members of the Competition Committee are named by the organising Federation on the basis of nominations received from the participating Federations. A participating Federation may not have more then one Competition Committee representative. The Representative of the organising Federation shall preside over the Competition Committee.

9.1.2. The Competition Committee receives protests concerning non observance of the rules of competition and makes the final decision in the event of disagreement concerning interpretation of the rules. Decisions of the Competition Committee must be in accordance with ICF rules. The Competition Committee may disqualify a competitor for the entire duration of the competition. The Competition Committee decides on all questions raised during the competition the rules. In the event of a tie vote, the chairman of the Competition Committee decides.

9.2. Officials Chief Official Technical Organiser Chief Judge Section Judges Starter Pre Start Controller Finish Judge Time Keepers Chief of Scoring Course Designer Boat Controller Safety Officer

9.2.1. Officials, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10 must be IJSL.

9.3. The examination for international judges (IJSL) requires that the following conditions be met:

9.3.1. Only federations are entitled to nominate candidates for this examination.

9.3.2. Applications must be entered to the General Secretary of the ICF at least two months beforehand and be accompanied by a fee of 20 US dollars

9.3.3. The candidates shall not be younger than 25 years or older then 65 and have at least 5 years of national competition experience.

9.3.4. Candidates who have failed one examination, can enrol for another examination, but not earlier, than the following year.

10. Duties of Officials

10.1. The Chief Official directs the competition according to the rules.

10.2. The Technical Organiser is responsible for. Local preparations for, and conduct of, the entire competition. The installation and proper functioning of technical equipment required for the competition.

10.3. The Chief Judge must ensure that the competition is run correctly in keeping with the competition rules. He interprets the competition rules and may disqualify a competitor or grant a rerun.

10.3.1. The Chief Judge must submit a report to the Secretary of the ICF and to the Slalom Committee concerning the running of the competition.

10.4. The Section Judge is responsible for the portion of the course to which he/she is assigned. He/she is assisted by Gate Judges. It is his/her responsibility to ensure the correct penalty or the correct judgement is given on the gates within his/her section. After consultation with the Gate Judges, he/she must communicate he/she must communicate his/her section. After consultation with the Gate Judges, he/she must communicate his/her decision of whether or not a penalty is given. The Section Judges observe the progress of the race in order to quarantee a fair run to all competitors No participating Federation at the competition may have more than 3 Section Judges for types A and B.

10.4.1. Gate Judges watch the gates to which they are assigned. In the event that gates are grouped at a single post at least 2 Gate Judges are required.

10.4.2. The penalties are signalled with the corresponding disc at all times.

10.5. The Starter assures that the competitors are in the correct order and gives permission to start. He/she can refuse to start a competitor : Fails to respect the safety rules. Fails to present himself/herself at the start at the moment indicated after having been called. Is not properly dressed or has no start number. Does not follow the Starter s orders.

10.6. The Pre Start Controller confirms that both the competitor s boat and personal attire meet the safety rules (safety helmet, buoyancy jacket and boat) see rule

19. He/she checks that boats carry marks approved by the Boat Controller. He/she prohibits the departure of competitors and of boats that do not meet the safety requirements. Any time lost because of the above goes against the competitor.

10.7. The Finish Judge determines when a competitor has finished the course and co ordinates with the Starter.

10.8. The Timekeepers are responsible for keeping the exact time and for transmitting this to the Scoring Office.

10.9. The Chief of Scoring is responsible for calculating the results of the competition and publishing them.

10.10. The Course Designer is responsible for the design of the course and ensures that the course is maintained in its original design during the competition. The Course Designer is responsible for proper hanging of the gates and of the other installations and must always be ready to make repairs or adjustments as necessary.

10.11 The Boat Controller assures that the dimensions and weights of boats in the competition conform to the rules and marks them accordingly. He/she ensures that the boats and buoyancy jackets conform to rule 19 and may mark them.

10.12. The Safety Officer, together with a rescue squad and according to the circumstances, rescues competitors who have capsized. He/she must have available the necessary safety and first aid equipment to use in the event of a serious accident, and must render effective assistance to a competitor in difficulty. A physician must be continuously available.

10.13. An official may assume two or more functions. No official may call to or in any way give technical advice to a competitor while on the course. It is forbidden for the Gate Judge to draw a competitor's attention, in any manner whatsoever, to any error committed.

11. Invitations

11.1. Invitations to an International Slalom Competition must be cent 3 months before the competition and must contain the following information: The date, place and type (A,B, or C) of competition. A description of the course. The approximate hour and order of the starts of the runs. The categories. Details of the nature of the course and character of the water (difficulty rating). Safety measures The address to which entries should be sent. Amount of entry fee, if any. The final date for entries. List of challenges, prizes and conditions under which they are awarded. In the event of an International Competition invitation in Type C races, the maximum number of participants per category must be specified.

12. Entries

12.1. Each entry to an international competition must be made by a Federation according to the instructions given in the invitation. An entries must contain: Name of the federation or Club to which the competitors belong. First and last names for each competitor. The categories in which the competitors or teams wish to take part. The first and last names of: team manager, IJSL, and other personnel.

12.1.1. Entries may be made by telegram or facsimile if they have been sent by midnight of the deadline date. These entries must be confirmed immediately by letter.

12.2. The deadline for nominative entries shall be 14 days prior to the first day of the competition.

12.1. Late entries will not be accepted.

13. Acceptance of Entries

13.1. The organising Federation must acknowledge receipt of the entries within 2 days.

14. The Start Order

14.1. The organiser is responsible for the start list at International competitions. He should refer to current World Rankings to assist him for Senior competitor starting order or current Federation Positions from the previous Junior World Slalom Championships for Junior starting order

15. Competition Programme

15.1. At least 24 hours before beginning of the competition, a final programme must be available to each participating Federation, giving the names of the participants with their Federation or Club.

15.1.1. In organising the programme, the following principles should be followed: The individual categories are run before the team categories. The runs of an individual category must be completed during a single day. The order of the races announced in the invitation, and the intervals between ff aces announced in the programme of competition are binding on the organisers. Modifications may not be made unless the majority of the team managers give their approval.

16. Alteration and Withdrawal of Entries

16.1. Announcement of changes or withdrawals must be made during the team manager s meeting, or in writing at least 1 hour before the first race of the programme on the day of competition.

16.1.1. Withdrawal of an entry is final and r entry of the same competitor or team is not possible.

16.2. Any change of entry must be communicated to the Starter in writing.

17. Start Numbers

17.1. Start numbers must be supplied by the organisers.

17.1.1. The number figures must be at least 15 cm in height and 1.5 cm in thickness.

17.2. They should be fixed visibly to the body of the competitors. In C2 the number is worn by the bow man.

17.3. Each competitor is responsible for his/her start number.

18. Instructions to Team Managers

18.1. Each team manager must receive, at least 5 hours before the beginning of the competition, written directions concerning the following points:

18.2. A meeting of the team mangers from each participating Federation must be held at an appropriate time before the start of the competition. The following points should be discussed: Additional instructions to competitors. Approval of the course. Changes and/or withdrawal of entries.

19. Safety Measures

19.1. All boats must be made unsinkable, and be equipped at each end with a handle attached no more than 30 cm from the bow and from the stern.

19.1.1. The following are considered as handles: loops of rope, rope with handles, or rope running the length of the boat from stem to stern, or a handle that is an integral part of the boat construction.

19.1.2. The handles must at all times permit easy insertion of an entire hand up to the base of the thumb to grab the boat.

19.1.3. The material used must be at least 6 mm in diameter, or a minimum cross section of 2 x 10 mm.

19.1.4. Taping of the handles is not permitted.

19.2. Each competitor must wear a fastened safety helmet and a buoyancy jacket (buoyancy aid).

19.2.1. A buoyancy jacket (buoyancy aid) shall consist of non-absorbent flotation material equally distributed, front and back, in a jacket or vest worn about the upper torso. It must have buoyancy sufficient to float a 6 kg legalised lead weight or it's equivalent in other metals, and should be designed to keep a conscious person floating in a face up position in the water.

19.3. It is recommended that organisers spot check the buoyancy of the jackets and boats at both start and finish.

19.3.1. In doubtful cases, buoyancy of the boat is checked. The boat must float level at the surface when filled with water.

19.4. Competitors must be able to free themselves immediately from their boat at all times.

19.5. In the event of non observance of the safety rules, the Starter, the Pre Start Controller, the Boat Controller and the Chief Judge each, according to their assigned duties, are responsible to prohibit a competitor from starting.

19.6. In any event, competitors start at their own risk, neither the ICF nor the organisers bear responsibility for accidents or damage to equipment that may occur on the competition course.

20. Course

20.1. The course must be entirely navigable throughout its length and provide the same conditions for right and left handed C1 paddlers. The ideal course should include reverse manoeuvres.

20.2. The course may not be less than 300 meters in length, measured from the starting line to the finish line (measured down the centre line), and it is recommended that the maximum length be no more than 500 meters. In any case the course must be no longer than 600 meters.

20.2.1. The recommended Minimum time of the K1 Men on the course should be no less than 100 seconds and the Maximum time should be no more than 130 seconds.

20.3. The course must consist of natural and/or artificial obstacles.

20.4. The course must consist of a maximum of 25 gates and a minimum of 20 gates of which at least 6 must be upstream gates.

20.4.1. The distance between the last gate and the finish line must be no less than 15 meters and should be no more than 25 meters.

20.4.2. The organisers must choose a course where a race can be run without annoyance or inconvenience to the competitors. The gates must be placed with correct presentation clearly indicated (by colour of poles and the number board), and sufficient room be allowed, to permit a correct negotiation and judgement of penalties without uncertainty.

20.5. If during a run in some category the Chief Judge finds that a significant change in water level has occurred that may be corrected, he may stop the competition until the original water conditions are restored.

20.6. If during the competition unusual circumstances alter the nature or design of the course, only the Chief Judge may authorise alteration to or change the position of a gate.

21. Approval of the Course

21.1. The course must be demonstrated by a non competitor capable of negotiating all the gates, and approved, at least one hour before the first run (and the Final where applicable). Ideally the boats for the demonstration run should be: right handed C1., left handed C1 K1,k1W, and C2. All paddlers should be capable of making the gates on an international level course. All forerunners for the competition have to be accepted by the Chief Judge.

21.2. The navigability of the course is determined by the Chief Official, the Technical Organiser, the Chief Judge and the Team Managers.

21.2.1. If the course is judged in some way unacceptable, the above persons named in Rule 21.2 are qualified to make a decision. If more than half of them ask for a modification, the course must be modified. In the event that the course is particularly difficult, the organisers must, upon demand of more than half the Team Managers, diminish the difficulties for certain categories. After the vote, no further modification may be made. The first start of the official training runs (when held) may not be held less then 20 minutes after the course is finally declared approve.

22. Training

22.1. At the organisers discretion a training run may be allowed on the completed course during international competitions. Training runs are not mandatory. Start

23.1. Starts may be directly upstream or downstream. Angled starts with respect to the current direction are not permitted.

23.2. Each boat must be held at the starting position until the start by an assistant to the Starter.

23.3. Only standing starts are permitted.

23.4. In the team runs, the second and third boats must be stationary (preferably held) until the first boat activates the timing of the run. In any case, any special instructions of the Starter must be adhered to.

24. Start Order

24.1. In individual categories, starts are separated by at least forty five seconds.

24.2. In the team categories, starts are separated by at least ninety seconds.

25. False Start

25.1. Only the Starter is qualified to determine that a false start has occurred and to recall the competitor by means of an appropriate signal.

25.2. The Starter determines if a second start is given and notifies the Chief Judge. Finish

26.1. The finish line must be marked very clearly on both sides.

26.2. A competitor s run is complete when he/she crosses the finish line. He/she must not cross the finish line more than once at the risk of disqualification from that run.

26.3. In the team event all 3 boats must cross the finish line within 15 seconds of each other.

27. Marking of the Gates

27.1. The gates consist of 2 suspended poles painted with 5 green and 5 white rings for downstream gates and 5 red and 5 white rings for upstream gates, with bottom ring always white.

27.2. The width of the gates is 1.2 meters minimum to 3,5 meters maximum measured between the poles. Poles must be round and 2 m long by 3.5 to 5.0 cm in diameter, and of sufficient weight that motion caused by wind is not excessive.

27.3. The lower end of the pole should be approximately 15 cm above the water, and the pole must not be put in motion by the water.

27.4. Gates must be numbered in the order of negotiation.

27.5. The gate number panels must measure 30 cm x 30 cm. The numbers must be inscribed on both sides of the panels using black paint on a yellow or white background. Each number and letter must measure20 cm in height and 2 cm in thickness. On the side of the panel opposite the direction of correct negotiation, a diagonal red line is painted bottom left to top right.

27.6. At each judging position the numbers of the gates being judged must be clearly displayed.

28. Negotiation

28.1. All the gates must be negotiated in numerical order.

28.2. All gates must be negotiated in accordance with the direction established by the correct side of the gate number panels, as defined in Article 27.5

28.3. All gates may be negotiated in any presentation from the correct side of the gate, as defined in Article 27.5

28.4. Negotiation of a gate begins when: The boat or the body or the paddle touches a pole of the gate OR Any part of the body (trunk and head) of the competitor (in C2, one of the two competitors) crosses the line between the poles.

28.5. Negotiation of a gate is ended when the negotiation of any subsequent gate begins OR the finish line is crossed.

28.6. The following conditions must be satisfied for a gate to be considered correctly negotiated.

28.6.1. The boat (or part of) and the body of the competitor or competitors must cross the line between the poles in accordance with the correct side of the gate and the course plan.

28.6.2. The boat (or part of the boat) is judged to cross the line between the poles at the same instant as the body crossing the line.

28.6.3. At least the complete head is required to pass between the poles in the correct direction, for the body to have passed through the gate line.

28.7. A correct negotiation of a gate without touching the pole with the body, the paddle, or the boat is a faultless negotiation.

29. Penalties

29.1. 0 Point Penalty
Correct negotiation without fault.

29.2.

2 Point Penalty Correct negotiation of the gate, but with a touch of one or both poles.

29.3. Repeated touching of the same or both poles is only penalised once.

29.4. 50 Point Penalty

29.4.1. Touch of a gate (either 1 or 2 poles) without correct negotiation.

29.4.2. Intentional pushing of a gate to allow negotiation (it is not judged an intentional push when the body and the boat of the competitor was already in a position in which it would have ideally negotiated the gate).

29.4.3. The body (in C-2 one of the two competitors) crosses the gate line upside down. (For definition of upside down see Rule 40.6)

29.4.4. Negotiation of the gate in a different direction from that indicated on the course plan. During any negotiation any part of the body (trunk and head) must at no time cross the gate line in the wrong direction.

29.4.5. Gate left out Gate(s) left out is determined to have occurred when negotiation of any subsequent gate begins OR the finish line is crossed.

29.4.6. A team failing to cross the finish line within 15 seconds.

29.5. Undercutting of a gate without a touch is not penalised.

29.6. Repeated attempts at a gate without touching the poles is not penalised if the body of the competitor has not passed the line between the poles.

29.7. Fifty penalty points is the maximum obtainable on any gate.

29.8. At all times, the benefit of any doubt must be given to the competitor.

30. Signalling by the Gate Judges

30.1. These signalling discs are normally used to communicate the penalties to the spectators.

30.1.1. A red disc, without markings.

30.1.2. Two yellow discs, marked with black figures 2, and 50 respectively, on both sides.

30.2. Signalling is carried out according to the following rules:

30.2.1. Faultless passage through the gate, no signal given.

30.2.2. Negotiation with penalty, a yellow disc is held steady (with the figures 2 or

50) according to the penalty points incurred.

30.2.3. Disqualification or elimination, a red disc, waved side to side. Clearing the Course

31.1. When a competitor is overtaken by another competitor, he/she must give way, if the Section Judge gives repeated blasts on a whistle.

31.2. The overtaking competitor must be attempting to negotiate the course properly. If he/she is overtaking as a result of missing gates, then he/she must not hinder the competitor he/she is approaching.

31.3. If one competitor is hindered by another he/she may repeat the run if so authorised by the Chief Judge.

32. Loss or Breakage of Paddle

32.1. When a competitor breaks or losses his/her paddle, he/she may use only the extra paddle carried on his/her boat.

32.2. For team runs, an extra paddle may be borrowed from another member of the team.

33. Capsize

33.1. It is considered a capsize when the boat is upside down and the competitor (or a competitor in C2) has left the boat completely.

33.1.1. Eskimo roll is not considered a capsize. In team runs, members of the team may help each other to Eskimo roll. Timing

34.1. The time of a run is measured from: The time that the competitor's body first crosses the starting line to the time when the finish line is broken by the competitor s body (in C2, the first body that crosses the line). In team racing, the time is measured from the departure of the first boat until the arrival of the last boat.

35. Calculation and Posting of Results

35.1. The following formula is used to calculate the results: time of both runs in seconds + penalties = result

35.1.1. Sample for an Individual Score in each run: Running time: 2

20

8 = 60 +60 +20.8 = 140.8 Penalty points: 2 + 2 + 50 = 54.0 Total = 194.8 points

35.1.2. Sample for Scoring of a Team in each run: Time between the start of the first boat and the arrival of the last boat: Running Time 18 0 = 198.0 Penalty points of first boat = 104.0 Penalty points of second boat = 154.0 Penalty points of third boat = 56.0 Total = 512.0 points

35.2. As soon as the results of a run for a competitor or team are known, the start number, the penalties, and the time should be announced and must be posted in the designated place until the time for filing protests has elapsed.

35.3. A competitor must complete both runs in order to be in the final results of a heat. Competitors who complete only one run are to be identified in a separate list.

36. Dead Heat

36.1. In the event that two or more competitors or teams obtain the same score, a tie is declared.

37. Protests

37.1. A protest is considered only when: It is submitted in writing by the Team Manager. It is submitted no more than 20 minutes after the official posting of the results for the last competitor in the category. It is submitted personally to the Chief Judge and is accompanied by a deposit of 25US dollars, or the equivalent in the currency of the country organising the competition. The deposit is returned if the protest is upheld. If the protest is not upheld, the deposit is turned over the Organising Committee of the competition.

37.2. A protest can be lodged against a decision of a judge: If there was poor or non observation of the negotiation of a gate. For a decision that is probably or manifestly erroneous. For obvious irregularity in the conduct of the competition.

37.3. The Chief Judge evaluates the legitimacy of a protest. He/she listens to the testimonies of the Judges and informs himself/herself of any other matters in dispute. The Chief Judge transmits his/her decision in writing.

37.4. At the discretion of the Chief Judge, inquiries into matters of fact or technical errors may be dealt with as simple inquiries (with no fee).

38. Appeal to the Competition Committee

38.1. An appeal to the Competition Committee must be made in writing by the Team Manager.

38.1.1. An appeal to the Competition Committee must be accompanied by a deposit of

25 US dollars, or the equivalent in the currency of the country organising the competition. The deposit is returned if the appeal to the Competition Committee is partially or totally upheld. If the appeal to the Competition Committee is not upheld, the deposit is turned over to the Organising Committee of the Competition.

6J

38.2. An appeal to the Competition Committee against a decision of the Chief Judge can be made when it appears that there is a contradiction with the rules of competition.

38.2.1. Items of fact cannot be contested by appeal to the Competition Committee

38.2.2. An appeal to the Competition Committee against a decision made by the Chief Judge during the running of the competition can be submitted at the latest, 20 minutes after the latter has announced his/her verdict.

38.3. Appeal can be made to the Competition Committee protesting the right of a competitor to participate in a competition if this protest has been given to the Competition Organiser at least an hour before the beginning of the competition, but no decision has been made on the subject.

38.4. An appeal to the Competition Committee against a decision on the right of a competitor to participate in a competition can be made until the beginning of the competition.

38.5. The Chairman of the Competition Committee must immediately reconvene the Competition Committee if a legitimate appeal needs to be dealt with.

38.5.1. The Competition Committee must make its own decision known within 60 minutes after the commencement of the meeting.

38.5.2. The decision of the Competition Committee is indicate with justifying arguments in writing to the complainant.

38.6. The Competition Committee should consult the Chief Judge, the Judges and other officials in order to obtain the necessary information to come to a decision.

39. Appeal to the Board of Directors of the ICF

39.1. A participating Federation can appeal to the Board of Directors of the ICF if, after the end of the competition, new facts become known that would have prohibited the participation of a competitor.

39.2. A competitor has the right to submit through his/her Federation an appeal to the Board of Directors of the ICF against a decision of the Competition Committee at the competition.

39.2.1. The Board of Directors of the ICF determines priority to give to this proposal.

39.3. An appeal to the Board of Directors of the ICF must be: Settled within 30 days following the end of the competition in question. Accompanied by the same deposit defined in Article 38.1.1.

39.4. The Board of Directors of the ICF makes its decision and addresses it in writing to the complainant party.

40. Disqualification

40.1. A competitor who attempts to win a competition by irregular means, who breaks the rules, or who contests their validity, is disqualified for the competition.

40.1.1. If a competitor is forced to break the rules by the action of another person, the Competition Committee decides if he/she will be disqualified or not for the competition.

40.2. If a competitor starts in a boat which does not conform to the rules, he/she is disqualified for that run.

40.3. A competitor who accepts outside assistance can be disqualified by the Chief Judge after the latter has been informed by the official judging the situation.

40.3.1. In the spirit of this article, the following is considered as outside assistance All aid given to a competitor or to his/her boat. Giving, passing, or throwing to a competitor a spare paddle or his/her original lost paddles. Directing, pushing, or movement of the boat by anyone other than the competitor himself/herself. Giving directions to competitors by means of electro accoustic apparatus or radiotelephone (e.g. radio telephone between the competitor and any other person).

40.4. A competitor who leaves his/her boat is disqualified for the run in question. If a competitor leaves his/her boat during a team run, the entire team is eliminated and must immediately leave the course.

40.4.1. After a capsize, competitors are not permitted to intentionally negotiate any following gates under threat of disqualification.

40.5. A competitor who is not ready to start as scheduled can be disqualified for the run if there is negligence on his/her part.

40.6. Crossing the finish line upside down disqualifies the run., The boat is considered upside down when the body of the competitor is entirely under water.

40.7. Any competitor or official whose behaviour is detrimental to the good order and conduct of the competition may be disciplined by the Chief Judge. Notice of this must be referred to the Competition Committee, who may after repeated action by the offender, disqualify him/her for that competition. Special Rules Relative to World Championships

41.1. Organisation

41.1.1. Organisation World Championships are only organised upon the authority of the Congress of the ICF and only in the categories given in the competition rules. These are open to all Federations of the ICF.

41.1.2. World Championships in Slalom are held in odd number years. The place and date is determined by the Congress in agreement with the competition rules of the ICF.

41.1.3. The Slalom Committee nominates a Chief Official, Chief Judge, and other officials as required, who are appointed by the Board of Directors of the ICF for the duration of the competition.

41.1.4. In any category, a valid World Championship is held only if 5 Federations start in that category. If during the course of the competition some Federations drop out or do not finish, the validity of the Championships is not affected.

41.1.5. No entry fees shall be charged.

41.2. Participation

41.2.1. A Federation is entitled to enter 4 boats in each individual category for the preliminary heat and a single team in each category in World Championships.

41.3. Runs

41.3.1. World Championships Slalom competition consists of 2 runs (in both Heats and Finals). There must be heats and finals. For the score the results of both runs are to be added. The start of the final second run will be the reverse order of the final first run result. The final course must have no more than 6 gate changes from the original course. Team events have one run only.

41.4. Scheduling of Competitions

41.4.1. Slalom competition occurs: Normally on 3 consecutive days. To better serve the sporting needs as well as the convenience of the public and media, the order in which the different categories are run is left to the choice of the organiser. There is no official training run at World Slalom Championships. For the finals of the individual event the following number of boats is allowed to qualify:

20 K1 Men, 15 K1 Women, 15 C1 Men and 15 C2 Men.

41.4.2. A tentative programme of the championship must be sent to the Slalom Committee 1 year before the date on which the Championships are to be held. With the permission of the ICF the programme may be varied or extended.

41.5. Invitations

41.5.1. Invitations for World Championships must be addressed by the organising Federation to all the other Federations in accordance with the competition rules of the ICF. This must be done at least 3 months before the first day of the competition.

41.6. Entries

41.6.1. Entries given the number of boats participating in each category must be in the hands of the organising Federation at least 45 days before the first day of the competition.

41.6.2. Names of competitors in each category must be in the possession of the organising Federation at least 14 days before the first day of the competition. No alterations are allowed after this date.

41.6.2.1. Submitted lists must give the names of the head of delegation, team manager, as well as other officials of the team. Note: each participating Federation should provide at least one current IJSL, holding a valid card. The names of these IJSL, holding a valid card. The names of these IJSL's must be sent to the Chairman of the ICF SLC by the end of March in the year of the Championships for him to present a list of Officials to the Board of Directors for their approval.

41.6.3. No entries will be accepted after the final published date of acceptance.

41.7. Acceptance of Entries

41.7.1. The organising Federation must acknowledge receipt of each entry.

41.8. The Start Order

41.8.1. The starting order on the Qualification days is the reverse order of the current World Rankings. Competitors who currently have no World ranking are put at the start of the list.

41.8.2. In the team events the starting order is taken from the average results of the best three boats of each Federation in each category during the heats. The starting order is the reverse order of these average results. In anomalous cases the team/s will start at the top of the list.

41.9. Programme

41.9.1. At least 1 month before the opening of a World Championship, each participating Federation must receive the provisional programme with an approximate timetable, and containing the number of registered boats in each category from each participating Federation.

41.9.2. The final programme must be in the hands of the participating Federations at the latest 1 day before the official training.

41.9.2.1. This programme must contain: The compete programme of events and the timetable for the events. The name and Federation of each participating competitor and their start numbers

41.10. Officials ICF

41.10.1. Jury During the World Championships, the supreme authority rests with the Jury. The Jury consists of five persons, including a member from the organising Federation. These are appointed by the Board of Directors of the ICF. Members of the Jury must be valid IJSL. One of these, either the President or another member of the ICF is named Chairman of the Jury. The Chief Official and other technical officials are subordinate to the Jury in agreement with Article 9. Appeal against decisions made by the Chief Judge must be presented in writing and submitted with a fee of 25 US dollars )or the equivalent in the currency of the country organising the competition) to the Chairman of the Jury within 20 minutes of the time that a decision is given by the Chief Judges. The decision of the Jury is final. The fee will be returned if the claim is justified.

41.10.2. Officials World Championships must be managed by the officials, listed in Article 9 of the Competition Rules, under the directorship of the Chief Official. Officials may assume two or more functions. With the exception of the course Sub Committee they may not also assume any National team obligations, such as Team Manager, Coach, Trainer. The names and details of these officials must be sent by the Federations to the Chairman of the ICF SLC by the end of March in the year of the Championships for him to present a list to the Board of Directors for their approval . The expenses for room and board during the whole competition is the responsibility of the Organising Federations for the following Officials : Jury, Chief Official, Technical Organiser, Chief Judge and the Course Sub Committee.

41.11. Course

41.11.1. The course must be navigable throughout its length.

41.11.2. The course must consist of 25 gates of which at least 6 must be upstream.

41.11.3. The course shall have a minimum length of 300 meters measured from the start line to the finish line (down the centre line), and it is recommended the maximum length be no more than 500 meters.

41.11.4. The recommended minimum time of the k1 Men on the course should be no less then 100 seconds and the maximum time should be no more than 130 seconds.

41.11.5. Two years before the World Championships the site of the proposed course shall be determined. The proposed course should not conflict with environmental or ecological regulations of the host country.

41.11.6. The distance down the course in meters down the centre line, shall be published.

41.11.7. The Slalom Committee names a Sub committee consisting of 3 IJSL from 3 different Federations, and are approved by the Board of Directors. Normally four days before the first day of the competition, the Sub-committee designs the course and supervises the hanging of the gates. The Sub-committee also design and publish the amended course for the Finals which has to take into account the positions for judging used on the first course. The amended course must have up to six gate changes only. The Technical Organiser and the Chief Judge may offer the Sub-committee their advice on the course design and hanging. A map of the course layout is published in a manner that can be seen by all the participants, as soon as possible after the course is designed. After assisting the Sub-committee in carrying out its task in the most efficient and clearest possible way, the organising Federation prepares a map of the course exactly to scale of 1: 1000. The organising Federation must provide the Sub committee with information on the possibility of and necessity for water control. The Sub-committee's expenses for room and board during the whole competition is the responsibility of the organising Federation.

41.12. Timing

41.12.1. Timing at World Championships must be carried out both by a photoelectric system and stop watch. In any case, the body of the competitor must be used to both start and stop the clock (see Article 34.1)

41.12.2. In the calculation of results, the photoelectric system has priority. In the event of failure of the photoelectric system, the backup times are used.

41.13. Anti-Doping

41.13.1. Doping is strictly prohibited. The organising Federation is responsible for controls being carried out during the World Championships, under the supervision of the Medical Committee of the ICF.

41.13.2. If a competitor or some members of a team are found doped, disciplinary measures can be taken by the Board of Directors e.g. temporary or definitive disqualification. During Olympic Games the definitive sanctions are taken by the IOC. Should the disqualification take place after the delivery of the medals, the position obtained by the competitor or team will pass on to the one finishing immediately after. All other competitors will move forward one position. The medals should be returned and presented to the winning competitor(s), according to the new classification.

41.14. Awards

41.14.1. The championships awards are given in the form of medals according to the Olympic protocol. The medals to be awarded shall symbolise gold, silver and bronze. They are provided at the expense of the organising Federation, which obtains them upon application from the ICF.

41.14.2. The medals are awarded as follows:

41.14.2.1. Individual Championships:

41.14.2.2. Team Championships

41.14.3. In the C2 category, both members of the crew will receive the appropriate medal. Only these medals and no other prizes shall be presented at the awards ceremony. Other awards or gifts may be given by the organising Federation on some other occasion. In no case shall the award be given other than to the person winning, or his official representative.

41.14.4. To maintain the solemnity and dignity of the presentation ceremony the competitors receiving medals must wear proper clothing (training suits or national uniforms).

41.14.5. ICF Nations Cups

41.14.5.1. Three cups in Slalom will be awarded as follows: One for K1 Men One for K1 Women One for combined C1 Men and C2 Men A cup will be awarded to the Federation with the highest points in a category as follows: K1 Men or K1 Women 1st Place 20 points 2nd Place 19 points 3rd Place 18 points etc. Combined C1 Men and C2 Men 1st Place 10 points (added together) 2nd Place 9 points 3rd Place 8 points In case of a tie the Federation with the highest individual position will win the cup in that category.

41.15. Results and Reports

41.15.1. A copy of the detailed final and official results of the World Championships, reports relevant to the protests, from the organising Federation, Chief Official and from the Chief Judge and all other relevant documents must be sent to the Secretary General of the ICF, and to the Chairman of the Slalom Committee, within 30days after the closing of a World Championship. See also ICF Standing Orders.

42. Special Rules for Olympic Games

42.1. The programme, the participation, and the invitation for the Olympic Games are established in agreement with the requirements of the International Olympic Committee. In all other respects, the technical rules of the ICF and, in particular, the special rules for World Championships, shall apply.

(INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION ICF)

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION

Slalom Racing Committee Section II

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS FOR JUNIORS IN SLALOM RACING

to take effect from January 1st 1997

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS FOR JUNIORS

PURPOSE

In order to extend the practice of Slalom, Championships for Juniors will be held in even years.

ORGANISATION

Championships for Juniors may be arranged only with the consent of the ICF Congress. Junior Championships are open for competitors from all continents, however only for National Federation members of the ICF. Junior World Championships are to be conducted every two years at a time and place agreed upon by the Congress and in accordance with the ICF rules. There is no entry fee.

AGE LIMITS

The first year a competitor can compete in a Junior World Championship is the year in which his 15th birthday falls and the last year he may compete as a junior is the year in which his 18 birthday falls.

CATEGORIES:

Individual: Women K1 Men K1 Men C1 Men C2

Team:

Women 3x K1 Men 3x K1 Men 3x C1 Men 3x C2

A Federation is entitled to enter four boats in each individual category, and a single team in each category. There will be heats and finals as in the Senior World Championships with the same number of boats qualifying for the final. There will only be one Team run.

START ORDER

At Junior World Slalom Championships the start order is the reverse order by Federation of the results of the previous Junior World Championships. Federations which did not participate at the previous Championships will be placed at the start of the list. Entries from Federations must therefore rank their entries in each category so that the organiser can allocate them to the correct starting positions. The starting order for the Team event will be the same as for Senior World Championships.

ENTRIES:

Entries for a Junior Championship can only be made by National Federations and in agreement with the conditions listed in the invitation. The inscription form must include forename and family name, sex, date of birth, and name of the competitors Federation. Before the competition the Team Manager has to present an official document such as a passport, identification card which includes a photo, for age confirmation purposes of the competitors.

I.J.S.L:

Each participating Federation should provide at least one I.J.S.L. holding a valid card.

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION

Slalom Racing Committee Section III

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD CUP IN SLALOM

to take effect from January 1st 1997

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD CUP IN SLALOM

1. DEFINITION OBJECT

1.1. World Cup Competitions (WCS) in Slalom are organised every year for the purpose of propagating the sport.

1.1.1. One award is made in each of the categories: K1 MEN, K1 WOMEN, C1 MEN, C2 MEN, bearing the title:
ICF Canoe Slalom World Cup

1.1.2. The WCS normally consist of 5 events in at least 2 continents. The final being mandatory. Competitors must have started in at least the heats of the final World Cup Competition to be included in the final World Cup Ranking.

2. ORGANISATION

2.1. Candidatures for World Cup Competitions must be proposed to the Chairman of the ICF SLC before the 1st March of the year preceding the competitions, by the National Federations.

2.2. The SLC select from the candidates for World Cup participation. These selection are endorsed by the ICF Board of Directors.

2.3. These events must be specified as WCS in the ICF calendar.

2.4. The same competition course may not be used more than three times in succession as WCS.

2.5. World Cup Competitions are valid unless at least 5 Federations start.

2.6. The competitions must be conducted in accordance with the ICF Slalom rules, except as modified herein.

2.7. WCS are only open to Federations who are members of the ICF.

2.8. WCS are ICF Competitions and must be held as totally separate events in their entirety and not interspersed with any other form of competition.

2.8.1. The competition must be organised on two days in succession. The first day will be the qualification competition, the addition of two runs and the second day will be the finals, addition of two runs. For the finals the following number of boats is allowed to qualify:

20 K1 Men, 15 K1 Women, 15 C1 Men and 15 C2 Men.

2.8.2. The final course will have no more than six gate changes.

3. ENTRIES

3.1. The Federations may enter up to 4 boats per category to take part in the WCS. There will be no team event held.

3.2. Entries must be received by 14 days before the respective World Cup Competitions.

4. THE COURSE

4.1. The course must be designed by two coaches of participating Federations, bv nominated by the ICF SLC. Normally these coaches are selected at the event by a draw carried out by the ICF Delegate. The coaches should not come from the host Federation. The coaches should come from Federations that have competed in the previous year in both Canoe and Kayak categories. Once a coach has been selected he/she should not be involved in course design at a World Cup until the following year. Only one coach may be proposed from each Federation.

STARTING ORDER

5.1. The starting order on the Qualification days is the reverse order of the current World Rankings. Competitors who currently have no World ranking are put at the start of the list. (see Rules for World Ranking 45 section IV)

5.2. The starting order on the second day is the reverse order of the qualifying boats in the heats.

6. ICF OFFICIALS FOR WCS

6.1 The SLC nominate 1 ICF Delegate for each of the WCS events.

6.1.1 Travel expenses, room and board of the delegates of the ICF are paid by the organising Federation.

7. DUTY OF THE ICF OFFICIAL

7.1 The delegate of the ICF supervises the competition.

7.1.1 He/she has the right to attend and vote at all meetings.

7.1.2 He/she must, in co operation with the organizers, establish the World ranking of all the competitors and oversee the production of the current World Cup results.

7.2 After each WCS the delegate of the ICF must submit a report to the Secretary General of the ICF and to the President of the ICF SLC concerning the sporting nature of the competition.

8. AWARDING OF THE WORLD CUP IN SLALOM

8.1 On the basis of the final results of each of the WCS s the Cup ranking in each category is established.

8.1.1 Each of the participating competitors receives points in the WCS as follows: 1st place, 30 points

2nd place, 25 points

3rd place, 20 points

4th place, 17 poinst

5th place 16 points etc.

8.1.2 After all the competitions are concluded, the final ranking, in each category is established by adding together the best three results one of which has to be the result of the final event. Competitors competing in the heats but not reaching the final will receive 0 points for the World Cup Final only.

8.2 The competitor with the highest total points is the winner of the World Cup in his/her category.

8.2.1 In the event of a tie in the final ranking, higher ranking is given to the competitor having the best result in the final competition.

9. AWARDS

9.1 he following awards are furnished by the ICF. 5 Cups for individual categories.

9.2 Medals or prizes must be awarded to the top 3 competitors in each category at each competition.

10. CLOSING CEREMONY

10.1 The final results must be announced and the World Cups awarded in a manner according to the statutes concerning ICF Competitions.

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION

INTERNATIONAL CANOE FEDERATION

Slalom Racing Committee Section IV

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD RANKING IN SLALOM

to take effect from January 1st 1997

SPECIAL RULES FOR WORLD RANKING IN SLALOM

1. WORLD RANKING

1.1 The objective of World Ranking is to establish a ranking system for top athletes in Slalom Racing.

2. WORLD RANKING SYSTEM

2.1 World ranking is an on going system of points to rank all the competitors in each category. The points given to each competitor are equal to the position achieved at each designated event. The events designated are the qualifying days at the World Cup events and the Preliminary events at the Senior World Championships. However the World Ranking points of the top 20 K1 Men, 15 K1 Women, 15 C1 Men and 15 C2 Men, will be allocated according to their positions in the Finals of those competitions.

2.1.2 The current World ranking is calculated from the best 3 results of the 5 current designated events.

2.1.3 The ICF delegate at the event calculates the World Ranking in conjunction with the organiser.


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